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AMD

NHS Clinical Commissioners co-ordinate support from CCGs to review use of Avastin to treat wet AMD

College Statement In response to the public letters sent by the NHS Clinical Commissioners to Secretary of State for Health, cc. Chair of NICE; Simon Stevens at NHS England; and the Chair of the GMC and signed by the Clinical Chair / Lead Clinician of 120 CCGs regarding the use of Avastin to treat wet AMD. The Royal

Use of Avastin (bevacizumab) in age related macular degeneration

Updated Statement from The Royal College of Ophthalmologists In 2011 a working group of The Royal College of Ophthalmologists released a statement regarding the use of Avastin (bevacizumab) in medical ophthalmology. It found that Avastin and Lucentis (ranibizumab) were equally effective in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and that there was no

Survey finds nearly 70% of patients waiting too long for treatment

A survey of ophthalmologists found that nearly 70% of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) had to wait more than the recommended two weeks for their first sight-saving injection. Many also wait too long for follow up treatment. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists and the Macular Society say their research shows that more resources

French health regulator reviews use of Avastin to treat AMD

College Statement The RCOphth notes with interest the move by the French health regulator, French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety (ANSM), in asking Roche to provide information on the safety and efficiency of the off-label use of bevacizumab (Avastin) to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Ranibizumab (Lucentis), which is licensed as

RCOphth recommends appraisal of the use of bevacizumab (Avastin) for age related macular degeneration

The Royal College of Ophthalmologists recommends UK regulatory bodies appraise the use of bevacizumab (Avastin) for age related macular degeneration potentially saving the NHS over £100million a year Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the commonest cause of blindness among elderly people in the developed world1. The ageing population in the UK and associated eye